Clinical Trials & Research

Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 30 2020 New findings from researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center about how some cancer cells become “addicted” to glucose could open up fresh approaches to therapy strategies for cancers with high levels of an amino acid transporter called solute carrier family 7 member 11 (SLC7A11).
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 27 2020 Though many negative repercussions of human immunodeficiency virus infection can be mitigated with the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), one area where medical advances haven’t made as much progress is in the reduction of cognitive impacts. Half of HIV patients have HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which can manifest
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 27 2020 Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 12 reported outside its natural niche, the cultured prostate cancer stem cells lost their tumor-inducing capability and stem cell marker expression after approximately 8 transfers at a 1:3 split ratio. To characterize the iPS87 cell line, cells were stained with antibodies to various markers
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 27 2020 UC Davis Health has two clinical trials underway for hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. The studies are evaluating the safety and effectiveness of two drugs — the investigational antiviral remdesivir, and sarilumab, a drug that blocks the body’s acute inflammatory
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 26 2020 Geographically isolated from mainland Eurasia, the island nation of Japan has seen little in the way of population mixing for thousands of years. In fact, after two waves of human migration–one 40,000 years ago from Southeast Asia and one 3,000 years ago from the Korean Peninsula–Japanese people are
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 25 2020 Novel, fully digital, high-resolution positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging of small brain stem nuclei can provide clinicians with valuable information concerning the auditory pathway in patients with hearing impairment, according to a new study published in the March issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. Using 18F-FDG
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 24 2020 Since the discovery of penicillin in 1928 by Sir Alexander Fleming, antibiotics have saved millions of lives from fatal infections world-wide. However, with time bacteria have developed mechanisms to escape the effects of antibiotics – they have become resistant. With fewer antibiotics available to treat resistant bacterial infections,
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 23 2020 Vanderbilt researchers have identified haplotypes, ancestral fragments of DNA, that are associated with hereditary prostate cancer (HPC) in a first-of-its-kind genomic study made possible by the study of prostate cancer patients with family histories of the disease. The researchers analyzed the Nashville Familial Prostate Cancer Study (NFPCS), in
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 22 2020 Partnering with five leading in vitro diagnostics manufacturers, an interdisciplinary team of scientists and physicians at UC San Diego Health and University of California San Diego School of Medicine today announced that the UC San Diego Center for Advanced Laboratory Medicine (CALM) is significantly ramping up testing for
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 21 2020 In view of the coronavirus pandemic, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) has underlined the need for long-term, knowledge-driven basic research. Like all infectious diseases, the current coronavirus pandemic can be tackled all the more effectively the better we understand the pathogen and its effects on humans.
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The barber had with him his tools of trade: a black leather smock, a razor, clippers, scissors and tufts of black locks he had collected from the floor of his shop. He would use them to try to cover the bullet hole that tore through his client’s head. Antoine Dow owns a barbershop in the
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 16 2020 Latino/a adolescents with a family member who was detained or deported beginning as early as 2017 were at high risk of suicidal thoughts, early alcohol use, and risky behaviors that can lead to school failure and chronic health problems. The findings were published today in JAMA Pediatrics. Our
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 13 2020 Microbiologists have long adopted the language of human settlement to describe how bacteria live and grow: They “invade” and “colonize.” Relations dwelling in close proximity are “colonies.” By pairing super-resolution imaging technology with a computational algorithm, a new study in Nature Communications confirms that this metaphor is more
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 13 2020 Individuals with Down syndrome are at a much greater risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, with inflammation of the brain starting early in life and the risk of Alzheimer’s reaching nearly 80% by the age of 60. The root cause of Alzheimer’s disease is unknown. However, its frequency in
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Mar 13 2020 Clinicians combat the drug resistances of some cancer types by using a combination of different drugs. To make this approach more effective, chemists have designed a chemical conjugate that can simultaneously attack several cellular targets using different modes of action. Such a single-drug therapy would increase the chances of killing all cancer
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Mar 10 2020 New research reveals bias and stereotyping among clinical and research professionals who recruit patients to enroll in cancer clinical trials. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS). It is important to include diverse patients in clinical trials to ensure that the results
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Mar 9 2020 Recently published research from scientists at Queen Mary University of London and GlaxoSmithKline demonstrates the complex nature of nanoscale adhesion mechanisms between polymeric biomaterials and biological samples.  Henniker’s HPT-200 plasma system is used in this work to provide the clean substrate surfaces (silicon and gold) onto which a variety of polymer brushes
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Digital technologies, especially smartphone apps, have great promise for increasing access to care for patients with serious mental illness such as schizophrenia. A new training program, called DOORS, can help patients get the full benefit of innovative digital mental health tools, reports a study in the March issue of Journal of Psychiatric Practice. The journal
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Although papillary thyroid carcinoma is the most common form of thyroid malignancy, it is considered to be an indolent disease that progresses slowly and has an excellent prognosis. Patients, therefore, may be monitored on a regular basis rather than undergo a surgical procedure at the outset. But results from a new large-scale study show that
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Assessments of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), which is a type of inflammatory bowel disease, are usually conducted via endoscopy and histology. But now, researchers from Japan have developed a system that may be more accurate than existing methods and may reduce the need for these patients to undergo invasive medical procedures. In a study
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Psychologists at the University of Bath, King’s College London, and Cardiff have found that a common test used by doctors and researchers to measure autistic personality traits lacks reliability and might not be capturing the right signs of autism. This means that research including scores from this test may lack validity and raises new questions
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Young children from low-income homes whose mothers reported frequent use of toxic chemicals such as household cleaners were more likely to show delays in language development by age 2, a new study found. In addition, the children scored lower on a test of cognitive development. These developmental delays were evident even when the researchers took
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