Allergies & Asthma

Antibiotic therapy was associated with significantly reduced treatment failure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients experiencing mild exacerbations, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis. In 68 randomized controlled trials of patients with moderate to severe exacerbations, antibiotics and systemic corticosteroids were associated with improved symptoms and less treatment failure versus placebo or management
0 Comments
Note that some links may require subscriptions. More than 300 Americans quarantined on the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Japan returned home on Monday, with 14 confirmed coronavirus cases among them. (NBC News) Shanghai doctors are reporting promising early results treating infected COVID-19 patients with the blood of those who recovered from the illness. (Reuters)
0 Comments
Sometimes, old ideas and time-tested treatments remain the best. Newer doesn’t always mean better. Except in the case of one of our oldest antihistamines, tried-and-true Benadryl. It is time for that old drug to be retired, sent off to pasture, and never used again. Goodbye, Benadryl. Fare thee well, adieu, and don’t let the door
0 Comments
Prenatal supplementation with high-dose vitamin D had no impact on asthma and persistent wheezing in 6-year-olds in follow-up of a study that did suggest protection at age 3 years. Previously reported data from the Vitamin D Antenatal Asthma Reduction Trial (VDAART) showed a reduction in recurrent wheezing in 3-year-olds associated with being born to mothers
0 Comments
WASHINGTON — Aimmune Therapeutics’ oral immunotherapy for peanut allergy gained FDA approval late Friday, for treating individuals age 4-17, the agency said. To be sold as Palforzia, the product consists of purified peanut proteins, to be administered in carefully controlled escalating doses. The approval comes with a mandatory Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) to
0 Comments
Whether evaluating patients for asthma or for COPD, spirometry is a critical and required part of the diagnostic process. Some primary care practices perform office spirometry, while many of us refer patients to PFT clinics and/or pulmonologists or allergists for evaluation and testing. Interpretation of spirometry can be challenging and not knowing normal values can
0 Comments
Sinusitis is an inflammation of the sinuses. Ethmoid sinusitis is the inflammation of a specific group of sinuses — the ethmoid sinuses — which sit between the nose and eyes. The ethmoid sinuses are hollow spaces in the bones around the nose. They have a lining of mucus to help prevent the nose from drying
0 Comments
A rash is a change in the skin that can result in bumpy, blotchy, or scaly patches. Many people have had an itchy rash at some point in their lives. Many are harmless and will go away on their own, but others may be more persistent due to underlying causes or conditions. Many different factors
0 Comments
Commonly prescribed antibiotics in infants were linked with higher risk of those children developing allergic diseases, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis, researchers found. Infants prescribed penicillin, cephalosporin, and macrolide antibiotics showed higher rates of later diagnosis with allergic disease, reported Sidney Zven, BSCE, of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda,
0 Comments
Note that some links may require subscriptions. The World Health Organization Director-General issued a statement on the bravery of health workers following fatal attacks on Ebola responders last week. Meanwhile, international organizations wondered if these attacks could potentially lead to a resurgence in Ebola. (Reuters) A time-tested way to combat the vaping epidemic among teens:
0 Comments
Note that some links may require subscriptions. The American Hospital Association observed the 20th anniversary of the Institute of Medicine’s seminal “To Err Is Human” report with a series of boasts about improved patient safety, including “14,000 lives” saved. The Justice Department’s plan to execute condemned prisoners starting next month with a single drug, pentobarbital,
0 Comments
The word shock can describe several different situations. Medical shock happens when the body’s cells do not get enough oxygen-rich blood. It is not a disease but a result of an illness or injury. A person may also feel shocked when they experience something unexpected. This shock is psychological and usually does not cause any
0 Comments
Note that some links may require subscriptions. A new Silicon Valley hospital — featuring 23 self-driving robots, a 50,000-slot pill dispenser, and an app to guide patients around — is a peek into healthcare of the future. (The Wall Street Journal) Purdue Pharma’s latest flub: caught planting an “anti-story” in The New York Times downplaying
0 Comments
Nut allergies are among the most common food allergies, and they include reactions to almonds, walnuts, and pecans. An allergy to peanuts, however, is not technically a nut allergy. Many of the 1.2% of people in the United States who are allergic to peanuts may mistakenly believe that they have a nut allergy, but peanuts
0 Comments
HOUSTON — Treatment with omalizumab (Xolair) was associated with improved endoscopic, clinical, and patient-reported outcomes in two parallel phase III studies in patients with steroid-refractory nasal polyposis. In the POLYP 1 and POLYP 2 trials, co-primary study endpoints were met, with omalizumab-treated patients showing significant improvements at week 24, compared with placebo-treated patients, in sense
0 Comments