Month: January 2021

Nagoya University researchers and colleagues have revealed that colorectal cancer tissues contain at least two types of fibroblasts (a type of cells found in connective tissue), namely, cancer-promoting fibroblasts and cancer-restraining fibroblasts, and that the balance between them is largely involved in the progression of colorectal cancer. Their findings, recently published in the journal Gastroenterology,
0 Comments
Senator Mitt Romney, a Republican from Utah, listens during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing regarding Iran-U.S. relations on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019. Al Drago | Bloomberg | Getty Images WASHINGTON – A group of 10 Republican senators called on President Joe Biden to consider a smaller, alternative
0 Comments
A new report combining forecasting and expert prediction data, predicts that 125,000 lives could be saved by the end of 2021 if 50% or more of the U.S. population initiated COVID vaccination by March 1, 2021. “Meta and consensus forecast of COVID-19 targets,” developed by Thomas McAndrew, a computational scientist and faculty member at Lehigh
0 Comments
Johnson & Johnson board member Dr. Mark McClellan told CNBC Friday that there could be enough vaccinations for the entire U.S. adult population by the summer.  “Assuming all of the close review of the J&J data all pans out, we’re going to have the capacity between Moderna, Pfizer, J&J, to have enough vaccines available by
0 Comments
A recent study, currently available on medRxiv* preprint server, shows that long-term adaptive immunity to endemic coronaviruses is widespread, but low in magnitude, and that it shares phenotypic features of spike-specific antibodies and T cell memory across all tested coronaviruses. Unlike the highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the a causative agent
0 Comments
The American health care system may be buckling under the weight of the coronavirus pandemic, but one number is inexplicably falling. Disciplinary actions against doctors were down sharply in the first 9 months of 2020, with 4,393 adverse action reports recorded against physicians in the National Practitioner Data Bank, a federal registry of health care
0 Comments
New research from the University of Iowa and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center demonstrates that offspring can be protected from the effects of prenatal stress by administering a neuroprotective compound during pregnancy. Working in a mouse model, Rachel Schroeder, a student in the UI Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Neuroscience, drew a connection between the work
0 Comments
Blood is vital to life, and a healthy body replenishes worn-out blood cells with new ones throughout one’s lifetime. If something goes wrong with this process, serious illness will result. Researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have now discovered a mechanism controlling the replenishment of blood cells, which could have relevance for new
0 Comments
A cross-institutional research group has revealed for the first time in the world that infants with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection who were treated with a combination of immunoglobulin fetal therapy and neonatal therapy with antiviral drugs were less likely to experience the severe aftereffects associated with the infection than those who only received the
0 Comments
A team of international scientists has recently revealed that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) interacts with two heme metabolites, bilirubin and biliverdin, to escape the antibody-mediated host immune responses. The study is currently available on the medRxiv* preprint server. Background The cellular entry of SARS-CoV-2, the causative pathogen of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19),
0 Comments
Fireworks emanate from the Burj Khalifah tower in Dubai during the Dec. 31, 2020 New Year’s Eve celebrations, which attracted thousands of tourists and saw relaxed restrictions on social gatherings, allowing up to 30 people to gather per household. AFP via Getty Images DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — On the surface, Dubai’s party scene feels
0 Comments
The National Institutes of Health is supporting a Wayne State University School of Medicine physician-researcher’s work at preventing and treating cerebral palsy in the form of two new five-year R01 grants worth a collective $5.59 million. The principal investigator on both projects is Sidhartha Tan, M.D., professor and co-division chief of Neonatology in the Department
0 Comments
Karen Roberto and Tina Savla, both core faculty members of Virginia Tech’s Center for Gerontology, are leading a five-year, $2.14 million study that will examine the role of extended family caregivers and their service use, needs, and challenges. The National Institute on Aging — part of the National Institutes of Health — awarded the grant.
0 Comments
The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation, the leading non-profit organization focused on both research and patient support for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), has entered into a partnership with LifeArc, an independent medical research charity that advances translation of early science into health care treatments or diagnostics, to potentially develop the first clinical lab test to predict
0 Comments
Jan 25 2021 Paris, France and Camberley, UK – 21 December 2020 – Novacyt (EURONEXT GROWTH: ALNOV; AIM: NCYT), an international specialist in clinical diagnostics, announces that following the detection of a new variant of COVID-19 by the UK’s COVID19 Genomics UK consortium, known as VUI-202012/01, the Company has carried out a detailed analysis of
0 Comments
Popular in aquariums all over the world, the zebrafish is native to South Asia. But here in a Cincinnati Children’s laboratory, the freshwater variant plays a vital role in scientific discovery. The iconic stripes are eye-catching but it’s the transparency of zebrafish embryonic tissue which are most prized by researchers like Oriana Zinani, a fifth-year
0 Comments
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection, with an estimated 79 million Americans currently infected with the virus, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If a high-risk HPV infection does not go away, it can lead to the development of a variety of cancers, including 91% of all cervical
0 Comments
Deborah Birx, coronavirus response coordinator for the White House Coronavirus Task Force, speaks after a White House Coronavirus Task Force briefing at the Department of Health and Human Services on June 26, 2020 in Washington, DC. Joshua Roberts | Getty Images Dr. Deborah Birx, the Trump White House coronavirus response coordinator, said in a CBS
0 Comments
Advancements in diabetes technology have improved quality of life and glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes. However, data show that a subset of children is being left behind. Those from low-income families and non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children are not experiencing benefits associated with technological advances, and are at higher risk for diabetes complications
0 Comments
Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most common form of acute leukemia in adults, that has gone into remission following initial chemotherapy remain in remission longer and have improved overall survival when they are given a pill form of the cancer drug azacitidine as a maintenance treatment, according to a randomized, international phase 3
0 Comments
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks about his administration’s plans to respond to the economic crisis during a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) response event in the State Dining Room at the White House in Washington, January 22, 2021. Jonathan Ernst | Reuters President Joe Biden has painted a bleak picture of the nation’s coronavirus outbreak in his
0 Comments
Many college students fully recover from infectious mononucleosis (which is almost always caused by Epstein-Barr virus) within 1-6 weeks, but some go on to develop chronic fatigue syndrome, also called myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME/CFS). A longitudinal study from DePaul University and Northwestern University followed 4,501 college students to examine risk factors that may trigger longer illness.
0 Comments